Welcome To The New Year…..I Think

With all the scary recalls last year surrounding items made in China, I really shouldn’t be surprised by this. However, you really have to wonder about everyone’s common sense. Maybe there’s some truth to the conspiracy theories that big business is out to destroy the small businesses, and to limit the choices poor people have for clothing their children.

Clothing

Mark Boster / Los Angeles Times
A Goodwill store in Los Angeles is among those that will be required to pay for private testing for lead and phthalates of all clothing for those under age 13.
Some owners say the cost of testing for toxic lead and phthalates will shut their businesses. The law goes into effect Feb. 10.
By Alana Semuels
January 2, 2009

Barring a reprieve, regulations set to take effect next month could force thousands of clothing retailers and thrift stores to throw away trunkloads of children’s clothing.

The law, aimed at keeping lead-filled merchandise away from children, mandates that all products sold for those age 12 and younger — including clothing — be tested for lead and phthalates, which are chemicals used to make plastics more pliable. Those that haven’t been tested will be considered hazardous, regardless of whether they actually contain lead.

“They’ll all have to go to the landfill,” said Adele Meyer, executive director of the National Assn. of Resale and Thrift Shops.

The new regulations take effect Feb. 10 under the Consumer Product Safety Improvement Act, which was passed by Congress last year in response to widespread recalls of products that posed a threat to children, including toys made with lead or lead-based paint.

Read the FULL STORY here.

I can understand the need for safety, but seriously, is this not taking that a little too far? Clothing? They are concerned about lead in fabrics? Buttons?

Ahhh, but a search finds that perhaps they may just redefine these safety measures to expempt certain items:

The Consumer Product Safety Commission gives a preliminary OK to exempt some items from testing after complaints of hardship to thrift stores and sellers of handmade toys.
By Alana Semuels
January 7, 2009

The Consumer Product Safety Commission has given preliminary approval to changes in new lead-testing rules after complaints that the measures could have forced thrift stores and sellers of handmade toys to dispose of merchandise or even go out of business.

If formally adopted, the changes approved on a first vote Tuesday would grant exemptions to last year’s Consumer Product Safety Improvement Act, which seeks to ensure that products for children do not contain dangerous amounts of lead.

As currently written, the act would require all products aimed at children 12 and under to be tested for lead and phthalates starting Feb. 10. Phthalates are chemicals used to make plastics more pliable.

Large manufacturers and retailers say the cost of testing will not be a burden. But small businesses such as handmade-toy shops and thrift stores say the requirement would force them to spend tens of thousands of dollars to test products such as clothing, in which the threat of lead is almost nonexistent. Many thrift stores said they would be forced to stop selling children’s clothing or close altogether.

The commission’s two members (a third seat is vacant) voted tentatively to exempt:

* Items with lead parts that a child cannot access;

* Clothing, toys and other goods made of natural materials such as cotton and wood; and

* Electronics that are impossible to make without lead.

The commission also tentatively approved a rule that clarifies how it determines exclusions from the law.

The vote opens up a 30-day public comment period that will begin when notice of the rules are printed in the Federal Register. Interested parties can find out how to submit comments by https:// http://www.cpsc.gov/about/cpsia/cpsialist.aspx “> http://www.cpsc.gov/about/cpsia/cpsialist.aspx from the CPSC at http://www.cpsc.gov .

Read the FULL STORY here.

Nice. Too bad they didn’t have the sense and logic to think their ideas through properly from the start but had to wait until the public was in a uproar to do so.

This one has me wondering though:

* Clothing, toys and other goods made of natural materials such as cotton and wood

Just how much of our clothing is actually all natural, let alone nothing more than cotton? Does this mean clothing that has rayon, nylon, spandex, polyesters will not be exempt? That would mean that thrift shops could only sell cotton panties and undershirts/t-shirts. Maybe some pajamas.

But wait……….pajamas for children are required by law to be “fire-proofed”………..I imagine that is done by adding some kind of chemical to the fabric? We have proof that this isn’t dangerous to childrens’ health?

I’m beginning to see that all our so called “experts” and “specialists” need to go back and learn to think properly and use common sense. The chaos they create is more damaging.

I personally believe it is all the chemicals found in everything (for our own good of course) that is the major cause to so many of the illnesses and rise in childhood diseases we see today. My reasons for that belief are for another posting on another day soon.

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~ by swfreedomlover on January 7, 2009.

6 Responses to “Welcome To The New Year…..I Think”

  1. We should put safety first. Business has always succeeded at reducing costs within constraints. We need to be careful not to “over protect” with needless constraints, but we must give consumers confidence in what they buy.

  2. “…. testing for lead and phthalates of all clothing for those under age 13.”

    So, if you are over the age of 13 or wear larger clothes for your age, all bets are off!

  3. This really upset me when I read about it. There are some wonderful small kid’s stores in NYC, including some that already make a point of trying to provide clothes and toys that are as safe and natural as possible. But this economy is making everyone struggle. I felt bad for those store owners and for parents when I saw this. You can hide so much garbage under the carpet of “safety,” you really can.

    Here’s to another year of exposing (and hopefully stopping at least some of) that garbage!

    • My first thought was how many families depend on these thrift shops for their kids clothing. On limited incomes they need them. This is just safety run amok! Bush has apparently done a good job in turning everyone into a scardy-cat. So much so that they don’t even realize that there are NO guarantees and no such thing as “totally safe”……..unless you live in a bubble and not the with the living.

  4. Nice. Too bad they didn’t have the sense and logic to think their ideas through properly from the start but had to wait until the public was in a uproar to do so.

    Laws are never thought through from a enforcement or operational effects perspective. They’re purely political creations. Abhorrent, but a fact of life.

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